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Moms social network more than the average adult


September 22, 2009
By Amanda Ryder

Sept. 22, 2009 – Retailers trying to influence moms should pay close
attention to the World Wide Web, though free stuff doesn’t hurt either,
according to a new Retail Advertising and Marketing Association survey
conducted by BIGresearch.

Retailers trying to influence moms should pay close attention to the
World Wide Web, though free stuff doesn’t hurt either, according to a
new Retail Advertising and Marketing Association survey conducted by
BIGresearch. Women with children at home are more likely to use
Facebook (60.3 per cent), MySpace (42.4 per cent) and Twitter (16.5 per
cent) than average adults (50.2 per cent, 34.4 per cent, 15.0 per cent,
respectively), according to the survey. Additionally, 15.3 per cent
maintain their own blog.
 
“Retailers who aren’t engaging customers through social media could be
missing the boat,” said Mike Gatti, Executive Director for RAMA.
“Twitter, Facebook and blogs are becoming increasingly popular with
moms as they search for coupons or deals and keep in touch with loved
ones. The web provides efficient, convenient ways for brands to stay in
front of their most loyal shoppers and attract new ones.”
 
On a scale of one to five, when asked what types of promotions most
influence their purchases, product samples in the store (3.8), product
samples delivered to home (3.6), loyalty cards (3.5), and special
displays (3.4) rank as a few of moms’ favorites.
 
Not surprisingly, moms frequently share experiences and information,
and say other peoples’ opinions influence their purchases. Nine out of
ten (93.6 per cent) mothers regularly or occasionally seek the advice
of others before buying a service or product, according to the survey.
Additionally, a staggering 97.2 per cent said they give advice to
others about those products or services they purchased.
 
“Quite frankly, moms like to talk,” said Phil Rist, Executive Vice
President, Strategic Initiatives, BIGresearch. “Whether they’re having
coffee with a friend or updating their Facebook status, these women are
eager and willing to share shopping experiences, both good and bad.” 
 
When it comes to where they shop for clothes, 32.9 per cent prefer
department stores and 23.2 per cent head to specialty apparel stores.
But, when it comes to shopping for their children’s clothes, 30.7 per
cent said they head to discount stores, 19.6 per cent said department
stores and 17.5 per cent prefer specialty apparel stores. Moms also
most prefer discounters the most for their children’s toys (45.0 per
cent) and their own personal health and beauty products (45.5 per cent).

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