Greenhouse Canada

News
Ontario to ban cosmetic pesticides


April 22, 2008
By CNW

container_plantsApril 22, 2008, Toronto — CropLife Canada , the trade association
representing Canada’s plant science industry, has expressed support in
principle for Ontario’s new proposal aimed at ending the non-essential
use of pesticides (lawn and garden pesticides), but urged that new legislation be founded on the
weight of scientific evidence available globally.

April 22, 2008, Toronto — CropLife Canada , the trade association representing Canada’s plant science industry, has expressed support in principle for Ontario’s new proposal aimed at ending the non-essential use of pesticides (lawn and garden pesticides), but urged that new legislation be founded on the weight of scientific evidence available globally. 
John Gerretsen, Ontario's environment minister, introduced the Cosmetic Pesticides Ban Act in the Legislature today. The bill contains provisions that would ban the use and sale of certain prescribed pesticides in the province. It's expected the new legislation could come into effect as early as next spring.
“We support a focus on eliminating the improper or unnecessary use of pesticides,” said CropLife Canada president Dr. Lorne Hepworth. “New legislation should be founded strictly on science. It is important to remember that the products available to consumers have been approved as safe for use through a rigorous regulatory process by Health Canada and other regulators around the world.”      
container_plantsThe government should focus on eliminating improper or unnecessary use – not the products themselves, he said. “Our goal is to help the Ontario government develop measures to ensure these products are only used when necessary, and then safely and responsibly by homeowners.”      
Nationally, Health Canada is responsible for evaluating all pesticides to determine if they are safe and effective before they can be sold or used. All pesticides, whether they are used in agriculture, golf courses or on lawns and gardens, have been assessed by Health Canada for potential risks to human health and the environment, with special attention to children’s health.
“The focus needs to be on how best to ensure that these nationally approved products are used properly, and only used where and when they are truly needed,” added Dr. Hepworth. “We look forward to working with the Ontario government, Health Canada and other concerned groups to implement responsible use practices.”      
Experts agree that the best approach to ensure safety to the public and the environment is Integrated Pest Management. By focusing on proper use only when necessary, and sticking with Health Canada’s science-based regulatory approach, Ontario will be protecting a sound scientific foundation for public policy, and the healthy green spaces that cool our climate, reduce erosion, produce our oxygen and provide the soft landscapes on which we live and play.  
“Regulations that focus on responsible use ensures Ontario supports and builds upon the health and safety measures already in place,” stressed Dr. Hepworth. “Safe and responsible use offers a solution to ensure the public has access to important tools to safely protect their family, their homes and Ontario’s greenspace from pests that can threaten health and devastate landscape.”      
CropLife Canada is the trade association representing the developers, manufacturers and distributors of plant science innovations – pest control products and plant biotechnology – for use in agriculture, urban and public health settings. CropLife Canada stands for safety and innovation supported by a foundation of continuous research and a strong commitment to stewardship.

 

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