Crop Protection
July 15, 2008, Guelph, Ont. — The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) recently announced the approval of a minor use label expansion for BIOPROTEC 3P Biological Insecticide for control of Duponchelia fovealis on greenhouse ornamentals, greenhouse herbs and greenhouse vegetables (tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers for fruit or transplant production) in Canada.
NEWS HIGHLIGHT

Minor Use control for Duponchelia fovealis approved
The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) recently announced the approval of a minor use label expansion for BIOPROTEC 3P Biological Insecticide for control of Duponchelia fovealis on greenhouse ornamentals, greenhouse herbs and greenhouse vegetables (tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers for fruit or transplant production) in Canada.
NEW PRODUCT

Pristine™ gains emergency use on cukes
Pristine™, a broad-spectrum fungicide from BASF Canada, has received another emergency use registration for greenhouse cucumbers. It is for sale and use in Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario for the control of powdery mildew and gummy stem blight.
Ontario farmers currently have nothing to fear by the province’s proposed Cosmetic Pesticides Ban Act. Or do they?
May 1, 2008 - With a Quebec cosmetic ban already in place and a proposed Ontario ban to come into effect within the next year, the use of insecticides, herbicides and fungicides is becoming more controversial. But where in Canada is pesticide use most prevalent?
The global nature of the industry also exposes a glaring Achilles heel

It is a strange irony that one of the key strengths of the greenhouse ornamental industry is also one of its major weaknesses.

April 30, 2008 - The issue of pesticide use is abuzz in the gardening world, as Ontario moves to ban cosmetic pesticide use and big box retailers announce they will pull chemicals from shelves. So, what do you think about the pesticide ban? Have your customers been requesting more environmentally-friendly alternatives? How will the ban affect your centre?
BLOG

Pesticide ban: tell us what you think
The issue of pesticide use is abuzz in the gardening world, as Ontario moves to ban cosmetic pesticide use and big box retailers announce they will pull chemicals from shelves. So, what do you think about the pesticide ban? How will it affect your centre?
April 29, 2008 - As big box retailers like Canadian Tire and Home Depot make plans to pull pesticides from shelves within the next year, Winnipeg retailers comment on how a pesticide ban might affect their business. The CBC reports. | READ MORE
May 1, 2008 - With a Quebec cosmetic ban already in place and a proposed Ontario ban to come into effect within the next year, the use of insecticides, herbicides and fungicides is becoming more controversial. But where in Canada is pesticide use most prevalent?
Last year in our August/September issue I wrote in detail about Sudden Oak Death (SOD). Amongst other ideas, I said that the Canadian Nursery Landscape Association was attempting “to develop and implement a Canadian Nursery Certification Program for exporting nurseries. The USDA is apparently considering implementing a similar program to complement trade with Canada. Only the Netherlands has such a certification programme for growing nurseries in place at this time.”
April 23, 2008 - Home Depot says it will voluntarily stop selling traditional pesticides and herbicides by the end of the year and will replace these products with less environmentally harmful alternatives. The Globe and Mail reports. | READ MORE
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