Greenhouse Canada

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Industry on the rebound, says StatsCan


June 1, 2010
By Dave Harrison

June 1, 2010, Ottawa – Sales of Canadian greenhouse products
increased 10.4 per cent to about $2.4 billion in 2009, rebounding from
declines
in both 2007 and 2008, according to Statistics Canada. Sales of nursery
products also increased.

June 1, 2010, Ottawa – Sales of Canadian greenhouse products
increased 10.4 per cent to about $2.4 billion in 2009, rebounding from
declines
in both 2007 and 2008, according to Statistics Canada. Sales of nursery
products also increased.

Sales of greenhouse flowers and plants were up 12.9 per cent
from 2008 to $1.4 billion. All categories of flowers and plants posted higher
sales, except for ornamental plants for transplanting (-20.9 per cent).

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Sales of greenhouse fruits and vegetables rose 6.8 per cent to
$929 million. Sales of tomatoes, the largest crop, increased 13.1 per cent to
$434 million. Despite a 7.6 per cent increase in production, the value of sales
for peppers fell 2.4 per cent. Prices obtained by Canadian producers were affected
negatively by lower prices for imported peppers from the Netherlands. Growers
in Ontario accounted for 60 per cent of sales of greenhouse fruits and
vegetables in Canada.

The total greenhouse area expanded by 5.3 per cent to 22.9
million square metres in 2009.

Total operating expenses for greenhouse operators rose by nine
per cent to $2.1 billion. Labour costs accounted for more than one-quarter of
total expenses. The total number of seasonal and permanent greenhouse workers
increased 2.2 per cent to 38,565.

Canada’s total nursery area increased by 1.3 per cent.

Sales of nursery products increased by 3.7 per cent to $658
million in 2009. Ontario, British Columbia and Quebec accounted for nearly 90
per cent of nursery sales nationally.

Costs for nursery operators grew 13.3 per cent to $579 million
in 2009. Labour costs accounted for 37.6 per cent of the total. Nurseries
employed 14,260 people in 2009, nearly three-quarters of whom were seasonal
employees.

 


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