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CNLA working with VRIC on breeding program


September 23, 2010
By Dave Harrison

Sept. 23, 2010, Milton, Ont. – The Canadian Nursery and Landscape
Association (CNLA) has acquired the rights to a wide range of genetics
from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s (AAFC) ornamental breeding
programs at Morden Research Station in Manitoba and
Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu Research Station in Quebec.

Sept. 23, 2010, Milton, Ont. – The Canadian Nursery and Landscape Association (CNLA) has acquired the rights to a wide range of genetics from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s (AAFC) ornamental breeding programs at Morden Research Station in Manitoba and Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu Research Station in Quebec. These programs developed many new plant varieties, including the internationally recognized Explorer and Parkland series of prairie-hardy roses.

“The transfer of genetic material from AAFC to CNLA is an important milestone for the industry, putting us squarely in charge of our own plant ornamental breeding program,” said CNLA Research Chair Michel Touchette. “Canada’s wholesale industry will have access to important genetic material that has been developed by AAFC researchers. In addition, royalty fees paid by nursery growers on new plant varieties previously introduced by AAFC will be re-invested by the CNLA into the development of new plant varieties.”

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The agreement between AAFC and CNLA resulted from extensive industry consultations that clearly identified the importance of plant genetic material developed by federal researchers over many years. Rose genetic materials have already been transferred to the Vineland Research and Innovation Centre in Ontario and research has already started.

“CNLA is a trade association and it was never our intent to become directly involved in research,” said Touchette. “Vineland Research and Innovation Centre is a long-term partner of CNLA heading up our research and innovation objectives.”

Vineland CEO Dr. Jim Brandle said the program “complements a suite of research programs we are leading for the nursery and landscape industry in Canada. With the hardy rose program in particular, we see opportunity in bringing the beauty of roses to less than ideal growing climates around the world.”

As the reinvestment of royalties is critical to a sustainable ornamentals breeding program, CNLA has also partnered with the Canadian Ornamental Plant Foundation for the monitoring and collection of royalties on present and future new varieties.

ABOUT THE CNLA
The Canadian Nursery and Landscape Association (CNLA) dates back to the 1922 formation of the Eastern Canada Nurserymen’s Association. Formerly the Canadian Nursery Trades Association, it was re-named in 1998 to better reflect the nature of its members. Today’s CNLA is a national not-for-profit federation of nine provincial associations representing over 3,600 members in the landscape, retail garden centre, and nursery sectors.

ABOUT THE VRIC
Vineland Research and Innovation Centre is an independent, not-for-profit organization that was created to be a world-class centre for horticultural science and innovation. In its capacity to enable and foster relationships with industry, academia and government, Vineland works to deliver premium product and production innovations. Vineland brings a global perspective to the Canadian horticulture industry and offers a broad range of lasting benefits to stakeholders both locally and internationally.


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