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BASF in joint venture on new insecticide


May 25, 2010
By Dave Harrison

May 25, 2010, Limburgerhof, Germany
– BASF is working with Meiji Seika Kaisha, Ltd. (“Meiji Seika”) for the
co-development of a new insecticide for the control of piercing and
sucking
insects.



May 25, 2010, Limburgerhof, Germany
BASF is working with Meiji Seika Kaisha, Ltd. (“Meiji Seika”) for the
co-development of a new insecticide for the control of piercing and
sucking
insects.

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Under the terms of the agreement, Meiji Seika
granted a worldwide, exclusive license (except Japan, Taiwan and South Korea,
where Meiji Seika will hold the exclusive license) to BASF to develop and
commercialize the new insecticide. Further details of the agreement were not
disclosed.

Representing both a new class of
chemistry and a new mode of action, the insecticide was discovered in a
research collaboration between Meiji Seika and The Kitasato Institute. The
compound shows significant efficacy for the control of aphids, whiteflies and
certain scales, mealy bugs and leaf hoppers, including those that have
developed resistance to other insecticides. This new insecticide is expected to
be launched in the Japanese market in 2014 and other markets in 2015. It has
potential use applications in vegetables, fruit, vine, row crops, and
ornamentals, and has shown to be effective as a foliar, seed, and soil applied
treatment.

“This agreement combines BASF’s
global market strength with Meiji Seika’s innovation skills, delivering an
important and exciting new insecticide innovation to growers around the world,”
said Markus Heldt, president of BASF Crop Protection division.

This new compound has been evaluated
in research trials and is considered a high-performance insecticide that ranks
low in toxicity to beneficial arthropods, including pollinators, and is an
ideal candidate for use in insect resistance management programs, according to
researchers at both companies. While significant research on the development of
this compound is planned, early results have been promising.

Other features of the compound
include low toxicity to the environment, non-target organisms, including other
arthropods, and mammals. With global regulatory requirements increasing, the
compound is expected to meet evolving regulatory standards that may further
restrict or force existing compounds off the market.


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